Brighton, England

Brighton is the major part of the city of Brighton and Hove (formed from the previous towns of Brighton, Hove, Portslade and several other villages) in East Sussex on the south coast of Great Britain. For administrative purposes, Brighton and Hove is not part of the non-metropolitan county of East Sussex, but remains part of the ceremonial county of East Sussex.


The countryside on our way to Brighton


Brighton Train Station


Eight million tourists a year visit Brighton. The town also has a substantial business conference industry regularly hosting the Liberal Democrats, Labour Party, occasionally the Conservative Party and Trade Union annual Conferences. Brighton has two universities and a medical school.




The promenade along the beach in Brighton has some shops, cafes, art and seafood stalls


The West Pier was built in 1866 and has been closed since 1975 awaiting renovation, which faces continual setbacks.


The seafront has bars, restaurants, nightclubs and amusement arcades, principally between the piers. Being less than an hour from London by train has made the city a popular destination. Brighton beach has a nudist area (south of the easterly part of Kemptown). Brighton's beach, which is a sand-free shingle beach, although it is sand when going into the sea, has been awarded a blue flag. The Monarch's Way long-distance footpath heads west along the seafront above the beach.


Brighton Pier (originally and in full "The Brighton Marine Palace and Pier", and for long known as the Palace Pier) opened in 1899. It features a funfair, restaurants and arcade halls.


A breath-taking landscape view. Peaceful and quiet place.


Seagulls fly and try to get warm


Perfect for chill out gateway.


This is where I tasted the best Fish & Chip!


The Monarch's Way long-distance footpath heads west along the seafront above the beach.


The Royal Pavilion is a former royal palace built as a home for the Prince Regent during the early 1800s, under the direction of the architect John Nash, and is notable for its Indo-Saracenic architecture and Oriental interior. Other Indo-Saracenic buildings in Brighton include the Sassoon Mausoleum, now, with the bodies reburied elsewhere, in use as a chic supper club.


The Royal Pavilion is a former royal residence located in Brighton, England. It was built in three campaigns, beginning in 1787, as a seaside retreat for George, Prince of Wales, from 1811 Prince Regent. It is often referred to as the Brighton Pavilion. It is built in the Indo-Saracenic style prevalent in India for most of the 19th century, with the most extrravagant chinoiserie interiors ever executed in the British Isles.


After the death of George IV in 1830, his successor King William IV also stayed in the Pavilion on his frequent visits to Brighton. However, Queen Victoria disliked Brighton and the lack of privacy the Pavilion afforded her on her visits there (especially once Brighton became accessible to Londoners by rail in 1841) and the cramped quarters it provided her growing family


Between 1815 and 1822 the designer John Nash redesigned and greatly extended the Pavilion, and it is the work of Nash which can be seen today. The palace looks rather striking in the middle of Brighton.

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